International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences

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Different Trends of World & Ethiopian Local Soybean Based Recipes and Their Health Benefits: A Review

Received: 16 January 2024    Accepted: 8 February 2024    Published: 28 February 2024
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Abstract

Soybean (Glycine max L.) accounts for 25% of global vegetable oil production. It is a high-protein, high-nutritional-value food that is beneficial for chronic disease prevention and treatment, alleviates depressive symptoms, and improves skin health, fiber, high in calcium and magnesium, essential amino acids, anthocyanin, saponins, lipids, and oligosaccharides. According to epidemiological studies, consumption of soybean based foods provides the advantages of lowering the prevalence of heart disease, reducing the chance of an ischemic stroke, and lowering cholesterol, which reduces the likelihood of atherosclerosis. It is effective against a wide range of malignancies, including breast, prostate, colorectal, ovarian, and endometrial cancers. Soybean recipe have antioxidant properties and helps to ease menopausal symptoms in women as well as lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. Isoflavones, a phytochemical present in soybeans, have numerous health benefits. Soybean recipes (dishes) are created in varied ways and composite ratios in different countries. Soy milk, bread, enjera, tofu and kukis are a few examples in Ethiopia. In all types of the recipes prepared, their nutritional compositions are outstanding and delicious in their tastes. The large population of Ethiopian Orthodoxy Christianity followers are not allowed during seasons of fasting, to consume proteins derived from animals. Hence soybean foods are good alternatives during those fasting days for the problem of protein malnutrition and vitamin A absorption. Ethiopian traditional unique foods like enjera, bread, wot, kitta, biscuit, kukis etc. can be prepared from soybean mixed flour. Owing to its superior nutritional value as a well-balanced diet and several health advantages, we advise making greater use of soybean-based recipes, oils, and products.

DOI 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20241301.12
Published in International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences (Volume 13, Issue 1, February 2024)
Page(s) 6-12
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Bread, Enjera, Ethiopia, Protein, Recipe, Soybean, Soymilk, Wot, Health Benefits

References
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    Wale, K. (2024). Different Trends of World & Ethiopian Local Soybean Based Recipes and Their Health Benefits: A Review. International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences, 13(1), 6-12. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijnfs.20241301.12

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    ACS Style

    Wale, K. Different Trends of World & Ethiopian Local Soybean Based Recipes and Their Health Benefits: A Review. Int. J. Nutr. Food Sci. 2024, 13(1), 6-12. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20241301.12

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    AMA Style

    Wale K. Different Trends of World & Ethiopian Local Soybean Based Recipes and Their Health Benefits: A Review. Int J Nutr Food Sci. 2024;13(1):6-12. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20241301.12

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ijnfs.20241301.12,
      author = {Kasahun Wale},
      title = {Different Trends of World & Ethiopian Local Soybean Based Recipes and Their Health Benefits: A Review},
      journal = {International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences},
      volume = {13},
      number = {1},
      pages = {6-12},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ijnfs.20241301.12},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijnfs.20241301.12},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ijnfs.20241301.12},
      abstract = {Soybean (Glycine max L.) accounts for 25% of global vegetable oil production. It is a high-protein, high-nutritional-value food that is beneficial for chronic disease prevention and treatment, alleviates depressive symptoms, and improves skin health, fiber, high in calcium and magnesium, essential amino acids, anthocyanin, saponins, lipids, and oligosaccharides. According to epidemiological studies, consumption of soybean based foods provides the advantages of lowering the prevalence of heart disease, reducing the chance of an ischemic stroke, and lowering cholesterol, which reduces the likelihood of atherosclerosis. It is effective against a wide range of malignancies, including breast, prostate, colorectal, ovarian, and endometrial cancers. Soybean recipe have antioxidant properties and helps to ease menopausal symptoms in women as well as lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. Isoflavones, a phytochemical present in soybeans, have numerous health benefits. Soybean recipes (dishes) are created in varied ways and composite ratios in different countries. Soy milk, bread, enjera, tofu and kukis are a few examples in Ethiopia. In all types of the recipes prepared, their nutritional compositions are outstanding and delicious in their tastes. The large population of Ethiopian Orthodoxy Christianity followers are not allowed during seasons of fasting, to consume proteins derived from animals. Hence soybean foods are good alternatives during those fasting days for the problem of protein malnutrition and vitamin A absorption. Ethiopian traditional unique foods like enjera, bread, wot, kitta, biscuit, kukis etc. can be prepared from soybean mixed flour. Owing to its superior nutritional value as a well-balanced diet and several health advantages, we advise making greater use of soybean-based recipes, oils, and products.
    },
     year = {2024}
    }
    

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Author Information
  • Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Jimma Agricultural Research Center, Jimma, Ethiopia

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